Different Types of Dog Vaccines and Schedules

Dog vaccines are needed so that dogs can live healthy and protected from certain diseases, as well as to prevent disease transmission from dogs to humans. Therefore, if you have a pet dog, it is important for you to know what types of dog vaccines should be given.

Just like humans, dogs also need vaccinations. Completing dog vaccinations on schedule is an important part of the care steps for your beloved dog. In general, there are 2 types of canine vaccines, namely mandatory vaccines and additional vaccines.

Mandatory Dog Vaccines and Schedules

As the name implies, mandatory vaccines are vaccines that must be given to every pet, including dogs. Here is a list of dog vaccines not to be missed:

1. Dog distemper vaccine

Distemper is a contagious and dangerous disease in dogs caused by a virus. This infection can be transmitted to dogs through exposure to air or shared feeding utensils with other infected animals.

If not prevented by vaccine, distemper risks causing respiratory problems and permanent brain damage in dogs. Distemper can also cause diarrhea, dehydration, seizures, and difficulty swallowing in these animals.

The following is the dosing schedule for the dog distemper vaccine:

3 doses given to puppies aged 6–16 weeks
2 doses are given to dogs over 16 weeks of age with a gap of 3-4 weeks
Booster vaccine dose in puppies after 1 year of full vaccination
Booster vaccine dose every 3 years in all dogs
2. Canine hepatitis vaccine

Canine hepatitis is a contagious viral infection that attacks the liver, kidneys, spleen, lungs and eyes of dogs. This liver disease is caused by adenovirus type-1, a different virus from human hepatitis.

Canine hepatitis can be transmitted through the saliva, urine, and feces of infected dogs. If not protected by vaccines, dogs with hepatitis can be at risk for severe liver damage and even death.

Therefore, to prevent this disease in your beloved dog, give him the canine hepatitis vaccine according to the following schedule:

3 doses of vaccine are given to dogs aged 6–16 weeks, 3–4 weeks apart
Booster vaccine doses are given to dogs every 3 years
3. Parvovirus vaccine

Parvovirus infection can attack a dog’s digestive tract and cause them to experience symptoms of loss of appetite, vomiting, fever, diarrhea or bloody stools, and even dehydration. This infection is most at risk for dogs younger than 4 months of age who are not vaccinated.

Until now, Parvovirus infection can not be treated. If it occurs in an unvaccinated dog, this infection can be fatal. That is why it is important to have Parvovirus vaccinated in dogs on the following schedule:

3 doses given to puppies aged 6–16 weeks
2 doses are given to dogs over 16 weeks of age with an interval of 3-4 weeks
Booster vaccine dose in puppies after 1 year of full vaccination
Booster vaccine dose every 3 years in all adult dogs
4. Rabies vaccine

Rabies is a viral infection that attacks the brain and spinal cord. All mammals, including dogs and humans, can contract rabies. Rabies in dogs is most commonly transmitted from bites or exposure to wild animals. This viral infection can cause nervous system disorders and can be fatal.

The best way to prevent rabies transmission is to vaccinate your dog on a schedule. Here is the dog rabies vaccine schedule and dosage:

1 dose given to puppies 16 weeks of age or under
1 dose given to adult dogs over 16 weeks of age
Booster vaccine doses are given every 3 years
Additional Dog Vaccines List

Dogs sometimes also need additional vaccines as recommended by a veterinarian. To determine whether a dog should be vaccinated against a particular disease, a veterinarian will assess the risk of exposure based on the dog’s place of residence, age, and lifestyle.

For example, your veterinarian may recommend certain additional vaccines if your dog is outdoors a lot, gets on planes a lot, or lives in a facility such as a boarding house.

Here are some additional types of canine vaccines:

Parainfluenza vaccine

Parainfluenza is different from canine influenza. This viral infection attacks the respiratory system of dogs and can cause kennel cough or cough in dogs. The parainfluenza vaccine schedule for dogs is:

1 dose is given to dogs aged 6-8 weeks, then a regular dose every 3-4 weeks until dogs are 12-14 weeks old
1 dose given to dogs over 16 weeks of age
Booster vaccine dose every 3 years
Lyme disease vaccine

This vaccine is generally recommended only for dogs at high risk of exposure to Lyme disease-carrying fleas. This disease is more common in dogs that live in forested areas.

The schedule for the Lyme disease vaccine in dogs is as follows:

2 doses are given to dogs aged 9 weeks with an interval of 2–4 weeks
2 doses are given to dogs over 16 weeks of age with an interval of 2–4 weeks
Leptospirosis Vaccine

This one dog vaccine is usually recommended for pet dogs who are at high risk of exposure to dirty water contaminated with Leptospira germs. The leptospirosis vaccine is important to protect dogs from liver disease and kidney failure.

If your dog is one of those at risk for leptospirosis, you should give him the leptospirosis vaccine on the following schedule:

2 doses for 8 week old dogs 2–4 weeks apart
2 doses for dogs over 16 weeks of age, 2–4 weeks apart
Booster vaccine dose every year, specifically for high-risk dogs
Bordetella bronchiseptica vaccine

Bordetella bronchiseptica disease is generally classified as a mild disease that often occurs in dogs that are kept close together, for example dogs in shelters or in pet shops.

This disease can cause dogs to experience a dry cough, vomiting, and loss of appetite. Although including mild, Bordetella bronchiseptica disease can be dangerous if it occurs in puppies. So, don’t miss this dog vaccine schedule, namely:

1 dose for dogs under 16 weeks of age
2 injection doses for dogs over 16 weeks
Booster dose every year or every 6 months, especially for dogs living in high-risk areas
Dog influenza virus

Influenza in dogs can cause respiratory infections. This vaccine is usually recommended for dogs who are in frequent contact with other dogs outside the home.

Here is the canine influenza vaccine schedule:

2 doses for dogs 6–8 weeks of age 2–4 weeks apart
2 doses for dogs over 16 weeks of age, 2–4 weeks apart
Booster vaccine dose every year

Like human vaccines, dog vaccines can also have side effects. Side effects that appear are usually only mild and temporary, such as fever, lethargy, pain, and swelling around the injection site.

If you still have questions regarding dog vaccines or you want to confirm your pet dog’s vaccine schedule, you can consult with your veterinarian. Your veterinarian can also help you recommend and determine the right vaccination schedule according to your dog’s condition.

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